MEET NIGERIA’S YOUNGEST SENATOR, HE’S FROM BAUCHI STATE

As youngest senator, I serve as bridge - Misau
How are you coping as the youngest among your colleagues at the Senate?

 We relate very well with them, and I give them maximum respect because of their records in government and politics. Thank God, the older senators don’t look down on me. They give me the opportunity to voice out my feelings, both in the chambers and during committee sittings. Sometimes, I even forget that I’m the youngest when I’m relating with them. Likewise, they do also forget that they are older. Some of them rely on me when it comes to certain things, they request for my inputs, especially on issues concerning youth. I get information on twitter, facebook and other social media platforms which, to certain extent, age may not permit the older senators to read them.

 Why did you decide to come to the Senate, instead of the House of Representatives, where you can be among your peers?

I decided to come to the Senate because I felt that the place is very quiet, I wanted to bring vibrancy to it. I feel young people, like me, should be there. So, I am trying to raise the quality of debate in the Senate. Secondly, I contested for the Senate because I felt that the Upper Chamber is the only place where you talk with authority and people listen to you. Anywhere in the world, the voice of senator is a voice to reckon with.
 Have you held any elective position before you came to the Senate?
I never contested for any position, except during the zero-party election. I felt it is only at the Senate that I can represent my people and contribute through effective legislation. At the peak of election campaign, my friends, and people around me, advised that I should go for the House of Assembly or the House of Representatives. But I opted for the Senate because I believe this is where I can contribute better.
 How did you make it?
I contested and won election without a godfather and nobody contributed money to my campaign. Some people thought I cannot win the election but, to God be the glory, I won. With my success, I have proved a point to the younger generation that they can make it, too, without a godfather. It is not about money, it’s about selling and endearing yourself to your people.
You were an aide to Senator Adamu Aliero, when he was the minister of the Federal Capital Territory. Sitting in the Senate with him now, how do you feel?
I don’t feel anything because all of us are in the Senate to serve the country. And even when I was his aide, I know that I was actually serving my country under him. I was assigned from the police force to serve him. This is why I feel comfortable while discharging my duties at the Senate, without minding the fact that I’m the youngest senator. I don’t think there is anything spectacular about that.
 Why did you leave the police after just 10 years?
I started as an assistant superintendent of police and I left as deputy superintendent of police after serving for 10 years.
 Why did you resign from the force?
I had interest in politics even before I joined the police. I participated in campus politics. It was my dad that forced me to join the police because he was a retired assistant-inspector general of police. I was the first person that worked consecutively with three FCT ministers as an ADC. I started with Aliyu Modibbo Umar, then Adamu Aliero and Bala Mohammed. I worked with them without any problem.
 Sir, do you have any regret obeying your father’s wish to join the police?
No, I don’t have any regret because the police taught me so many things that guide me in my day-to-day activities. I thank God for making my parents to train me this way. This is why I always stand by the truth.
 How many motions and bills have you sponsored?
I have nine motions, two have been taken and I have 10 bills. Two of the bills have passed second reading and one has passed first reading.
 It was widely believed that your bill on the administration of criminal justice was conceived to weaken the anti-corruption war of this administration.
I’m not trying to weaken the corruption war. In fact, I’m trying to strengthen it with the bill. There were complaints by lawyers and other stakeholders in the judiciary pertaining to sections 305 and 306 of the Criminal Administration Act. I sponsored the bill just for this purpose, and not to hinder the fight against corruption.

Read more at http://www.dailytrust.com.ng/news/politics/as-youngest-senator-i-serve-as-bridge–misau/150830.html#SmG3324le88rGKsC.99